What are you reading? (Book recommendations thread)


#1

I love stumbling upon a good read so I thought that we could start a thread for it. If you’re reading something feel free to share and post a little about it. Audio books are also allowed!

What I’m reading now:

I was thinking the other day of how organic foods became popular to in response to the fast/processed food culture that led to obesity in America. In my view NoSurf is a similar response to social media, which I consider a mental form of processed food. Somewhat coincidentally, I saw this on the shelf of my library for $1 so i decided to buy it. I haven’t started reading yet but I’ll let you guys know how it is!


#2

I’ve just finished reading the Shallows and found it quite interesting. Though I did not fully agree with all his arguments, I found myself agreeing with most of them. Now, after having finished it, I am going to start reading Stephen Hawking’s book A Brief History of Time, which has become a bestseller in my country shortly after his death and I found the subject matter quite interesting.
Besides all of this, I have gotten a subscription to Perry Rhodan, which is a quite popular science-fiction series in my country. They are released in the form of rather short, 60-page long magazines each week and I’ve just received my first copy on Friday.


#3

Hey I loved both the Shallows and the Brief History of Time! :slight_smile: Good choice.
I’m now reading two books - Endgame by Derrick Jensen and “Alone Together” by Sherry Turkle.


#4

Just finished ready player one after missing the movie date.

Honestly, even if in the end the story ends in high notes, the world is really a dystopia of people escaping the reality to comfort themselves. I’m still a gamer (even if just intermittently), so the escapism notes feels really intense. The feeling that you want to numb reality by becoming someone else, the avatar in the other world who is successful, have better life than you right now is just so prominent here, with almost everyone escaping reality by playing the game.

Well… I don’t recommend this book. Fun one to fill the time, but it feels like there is so many deus ex machina in the story.


#5

Awesome thread idea! I just recently finished a really good book called “As a Man Thinketh” by James Allen that explores and makes a convincing case for our thoughts shaping not only the course of our destinies but also the circumstances around us. If anyone is interested in visualization/the power of thought, I would highly recommend it. “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill is also a great book on the subject.

I’m about halfway through an really great book called “The Willpower Instinct” by Kelly McGonigal. I’m learning a ton about willpower and how to prevent shortcomings, and wish I read the book at the start of my journey alongside the shallows. Incredibly helpful and I’m already started to see positive effects in my life from reading the book.


#6

Might be unconventional here, but I’m currently reading More Than Two by Franklin Veaux and Eve Rickert.

While the book has a focus on making polyamory work, it’s also written in a way that anyone could profit from it, really. Even monogamous relationships. It places a lot of value on self-growth, self-awareness, skills that are important in relationships no matter if platonic, romantic, monogamous, polyamorous… even skills that are valuable in standing up for yourself in the rest of your life outside of relationships. It adresses how to counteract and work on your fear of abandonment/being replaced/of loss, and talks about how jealousy comes to life and what to do to work through it. It underlines how to not treat people like your need-fulfillment machines and how to consider their emotions and stop controlling them, while starting to learn how to feel fine being alone or without them as well - to learn that you can be happy without them, to not be too needy or clingy. There’s also a part about worthiness and how to learn to feel worthy, and how to be vulnerable and feel worthy enough to let connections happen. It places a lot of emphasis on the fact that the qualities you want to have (like compassion, for example) are things you work on and are visible in your acts, it’s not inherent to you and it needs practice.

This is just a small part of what this book is about (I’m only at page 100 from ~450), but maybe this is intriguing to some of you already. I feel like a lot of what’s written in this book, at least in the first 100 pages, also sounds kind of stoic in its approaches on how to handle feelings and take responsibility for them, as well as striving to act in a virtuous, ethical manner always. And I read The Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday every day, which offers a quote from a historic Stoicism personality daily and a few lines of thought to go with it, so it fits in well.


#7

[QUOTE=“jeytas, post: 242, member: 19”]I’ve just finished reading the Shallows and found it quite interesting. Though I did not fully agree with all his arguments, I found myself agreeing with most of them. Now, after having finished it, I am going to start reading Stephen Hawking’s book A Brief History of Time, which has become a bestseller in my country shortly after his death and I found the subject matter quite interesting.
Besides all of this, I have gotten a subscription to Perry Rhodan, which is a quite popular science-fiction series in my country. They are released in the form of rather short, 60-page long magazines each week and I’ve just received my first copy on Friday.[/QUOTE]

Which parts did you disagree with? I personally found him admitting how attached he was to his wifi connected blu ray player somewhat deflating. I guess on the spectrum of internet use I’m somewhat conservative and I like to keep it as spartan as possible. Almost a monastic environment but still connected enough to do modern world things.


#9

There are discussions whether Orwell or Huxley was more right. I have a weird feeling our world managed to fit both of their narratives, making them equally right.


#10

I started reading The Joy Of Missing Out by Christina Crook, and it’s been pretty good. If you’ve already read The Shallows and the other usual recommendations/staples in internet addiction books, then I think you can skip it. It’s a great book however for people who haven’t read those and seek an easy and engaging book to get into that stuff, and then dive deeper with The Shallows afterwards. There’s a lot of quotes and statistics of these books inside JOMO, that’s why I’m saying it; and while it isn’t childish or immature language, it still reads more casual or online blog-like than Nicolas Carr’s writing style, for example. It has a lot of personal experiences in it, because the author herself disconnected completely for a while and wrote a series of letters called Letters of a Luddite during that time. The book is basically some science facts gathered from books like Carr’s, with personal anecdotes and experience, as well as reader challenges (you’re encouraged to work with the book and do the exercises at the end of each chapter).

It is fairly short, and the only thing I dislike about it is that there are parts that are very repetitive. It is fine and necessary to draw back to earlier chapters and experiences, but certain short passages are copy pasted in multiple chapters instead of rewritten in different words or shortly summarized. But I do enjoy reading it and if anyone seeks a good intro before diving in deeper with more sciency books, this is a good one.


#12

Currently reading “The God Delusion” by Richard Dawkins. - Its a book that gives rather strong arguments on why God most certainly does not exist. Interessting read so far, have not finished it yet .


#13

Finished up the “The Willpower Instinct” by Kelly McGonigal, and “The Magic of Believing” by Claude M. Bristol recently. Next up is a reread of both “Psycho-cybernetics” by Maxwell Maltz and “The Shallows” by Nicholas Carr since I read them years ago and want to re-experience both.


#14

Just finished “And then there were none” by Agatha Christie. My first Agatha Christie novel, a great book, huge amount of twists and turns. The plot is crafted so perfectly, everything fits together like a jigsaw puzzle. I really enjoyed it.

Next book to get started on is Pride and Prejudice!


#16

Basically the intervention of the logical course of event by the hand of the writer of the story. Through the machination of someone but MC, the moment where main character should fail, did not. It is also happens out of the blue, with no foreshadowing at all.


#17

I’m currently reading “4321” by Paul Auster. I really enjoy it, though his way of writing is really different to what I’m used to - he mostly uses reported speech, the dialogues don’t have quotation marks and some sentences are as long as a page (at least on Kindle). It’s about Archie Ferguson, a young boy, and 4 variations of his life. It’s 1200 pages long so I hope I can finish it without getting bored too soon, I’m currently at one third of the book. I also started to read “Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind” for the second time - I hope it can help me be more mindful again, I got pretty mindless over the course of the last few months.

After visiting the “Game of Thrones Live Concert Experience”, I feel an itch to read another great fantasy series. I thought of starting “Gardens of the Moon” by Steven Erikson (in German), because the English version seems to be full of words I don’t yet know. There are a lot of great recommendations out there for fantasy books, but I’m mostly looking for something like GoT.


#18

I’m reading “Daring Greatly” by Brené Brown (a book about vulnerability and courage) and “I’ll Be Gone In The Dark” by Michelle McNamara (a book about the now apprehended Golden State Killer).


#19

I’m 97 pages into Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and The Business of Keeping Us Hooked. It’s a great motivator for keeping up with this NoSurf habit.


#20

I’m reading this one right now too! Really great read so far :slight_smile:


#21

Looks like it may the first book I read end to end in a long while. There are so many interesting things in it.


#22

I am currently reading
Wabi-Sabi: Further Thoughts by Leonard Koren.
He is the guy who coined the phrase wabi-sabi and in his first book, he delved very deep into what wabi-sabi is, how it is going missing in modern Japanese society, and how designers can make use of it as well.
This is his second book, where he is adding some details and offering a how-to implement wabi-sabi. I think it hits the right note between design, philosophy, spirituality and education. I really like this book :slight_smile:


#23

I’m currently reading 10% Happier by Dan Harris for non-fiction and Ship of Destiny by Robin Hobb for fiction. Normally I only have one book on the go at a time, but I’m trying to learn more about meditation so picked up the Dan Harris book.